2014 Mother’s Day Report

2014 Mother’s Day Report

In our 2014 Mother’s Day Report, Long-Term Care: Managing Our Future, OWL takes an in-depth look at the issue of long-term care.

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What makes OWL unique is our sharp focus. We are the only organization that works solely on the economic security and quality of life issues impacting women over 40, who account for almost one-quarter of the U.S. population.

Join us in speaking up for this estimated 78-million-member demographic whose voice on the policy stage has yet to match its size.

 


Latest from OWL

OWL Talks Business with Shark Tank’s Barbara Corcoran

If you’ve ever seen ABC’s Shark Tank, a reality show where Barbara Corcoran sits on a panel of successful venture capitalists hearing pitches from aspiring entrepreneurs, you’ll know exactly why this feisty businesswoman gives a whole new meaning to the term ‘loan shark’.

    In fact, at this week’s Senate hearing on Women Entrepreneurship, hosted by the U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship, The Shark wasn’t the only one talking about loans. Everyone involved was emphasizing the challenge women face in accessing finance, from Small Business Administrator Maria Contreras-Sweet to media mogul and entrepreneur Nely Galán to leaders from Women Impacting Public Policy (WIPP). When it comes to women reeling in venture capital funding, witness after witness proved that it is “enormously difficult to compete with men”. 

    Given the egregious findings of the report Senator Cantwell released yesterday on behalf of the Committee, ‘enormously’ is an understatement. The report stated that women only receive 4.4% of business loans, and that the U.S. government has never met its goal of allocating a mere 5% of federal contracts to women-led businesses.

Click here to read the full blog post.

Posted by Brittany Reid on 07/25 at 11:47 AM
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Know the Facts: Misconceptions About SSDI

There’s been a lot of news lately about the Social Security Disability Insurance Program, including accusations that it’s being abused, that claims are skyrocketing, and that it’s about to go bankrupt.

It’s important to know the facts, and the recent post from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities is an excellent summary of the critical role SSDI plays in millions of people’s lives, and what the real funding issues are.

First, SSDI payments go to people in need. The article points out that the typical beneficiary is in his or her late 50s and suffers from a severe mental, musculoskeletal, or other debilitating impairment.

Many are also poor. CBPP notes that poverty rates for disability insurance recipients are twice as high – even when taking those benefits into account. 

Overall, about one-fifth of all disabled-worker families are poor; without DI, nearly half would be.

And yes, the rolls have been growing – but the reasons are from well-known demographic factors: more people, more older people, more women in the workforce – and ironically enough, the rise in the Social Security full retirement age from 65 to 66. The recession also bumped up applications, since unemployment drives those up. But approval rates actually fall when unemployment is high. 

Click here to read the full blog post.

Posted by Pat Lewis on 07/24 at 03:16 PM
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Commemorating the 50th Birthday of the Civil Rights Act

“We all should know that diversity makes for a rich tapestry, and we must understand that all the threads of the tapestry are equal in value no matter what their color.” —Maya Angelou

50 years ago today, Congress passed the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964, and created the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) to enforce the Act. Today, the EEOC enforces a number of federal statutes protecting workers from discrimination.

As we recognize the progress we’ve made as a nation in achieving equality for all, we also realize more needs to be done.  Despite federal anti-discrimination laws, age-based discrimination complaints have increased by 50% over the past several years, and women still earn only 77 cents for every dollar men earn.  OWL will continue its work on behalf of women 40+ in the areas of equality, economic security, and quality of life. 

Click here to read the full blog post.

Posted by Bobbie Brinegar on 07/02 at 04:17 PM
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