Our Women Mean Business: Encore Careers After 40

Our Women Mean Business: Encore Careers After 40

Women face a decidedly uneven playing field when it comes to capital. OWL's new initiative aims to change that.

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What makes OWL unique is our sharp focus. We are the only organization that works solely on the economic security and quality-of-life issues impacting women over 40, who account for almost one-quarter of the U.S. population.

Join us in speaking up for this estimated 78-million-member demographic whose voice on the policy stage has yet to match its size.

 


Latest from OWL

Good Health:  A Personal and Social Responsibility


Guest post by Bonnie S. Muheim, a health care consultant and freelance writer based in Washington, DC. 

One hundred years ago, people rarely saw doctors when they were ill.  Available medicines often did not do much to alleviate infection and disease, and treatments to reduce pain and suffering were few.  Life spans reflected these limitations.

Fast forward to today.  We have a broad network of medical specialists and subspecialists who deal with the entire spectrum of medical conditions, illnesses and diseases.  Scientific research has given us multiple categories of medicines and, within each category, numerous medications that can moderate, arrest and often cure illness and disease.  Happily, our life spans reflect the evolution of knowledge and the development of innovative and effective medicines.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), we are witnessing an unprecedented growth of older adults and, by 2050, there will be double the number of people age 65 or older in the United States that we had in 2010.  The growth can be attributed to baby boomers reaching senior status and the fact that Americans are simply living longer.  Where once our ancestors got sick and perished, nowadays our serious illnesses often can be managed with proper prevention, diagnosis and treatment.  Many acute or deadly illnesses, such as AIDS and some cancers, have become chronic illnesses.  Other potentially fatal conditions, such as hypertension and diabetes, are now manageable with medication and close medical supervision.

The good news, too, is that while older Americans are living longer, they also are leading more independent, productive, and healthier lives.  Many are putting off their retirement and a new focus on healthy living is encouraging seniors to remain active and engaged in their families, jobs and community. Read more.

Posted by Pat Lewis on 03/23 at 10:42 AM
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February Newsletter Released

This month’s newsletter includes a Huffington Post article by OWL Executive Director Bobbie Brinegar entitled, ‘Another Social Security Red Herring?’.

Check out the full observer here.

Posted by Brittany Reid on 02/27 at 12:04 PM
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Can we be adults about this?

There’s a high price to pay for political posturing: our public health. As the debate around the anti-vaccination movement rages on, it is important to bear in mind that the vast majority of Americans, across party lines, believe that the benefits of vaccination outweigh the risks. According to the nation’s leading researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and the National Institutes of Health, Americans are making the right choice when they stay up to date with their vaccinations.

Unfortunately, despite the effectiveness of potentially life-saving preventive services, such as screenings and vaccinations, in 2013 only 25% of adults ages 50 to 64 and fewer than 50% of adults age 65 years or older were up to date. Politicians are making a mostly indisputable choice into a partisan hot potato about the reach of government and personal freedoms. By creating a debate around vaccinations politicians are generating more skepticism from adults, particularly adult women, who are making important decisions about not only their child’s vaccinations, but their own. According to one study, the largest contributing factor to uncertainty about vaccinations was a “conspiratorial mindset”. The political is detracting from the practical and undermining a proven prevention strategy: adult vaccinations.

Read more.

Posted by Bobbie Brinegar on 02/09 at 11:35 AM
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